MMT Blog

It may be a wait-and-see approach to the coronavirus (COVID-19) right now with everyone “monitoring the situation” but the key is to stay focused because there are always opportunities! For example, our newly-launched Sourcing Assistance Program. 

Recently, we've received an unprecedented number of inquiries about ways we can assist in facilitating sourcing and procurement needs. We're trying to make this as simple as possible.

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Mike Stiles, CEO of R&D/Leverage: Our business no, but we are hearing from some of our convertor customers that parts availability – specifically injection molded parts previously sourced from China – have been subjected to supply-chain breaks.

 

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Coping with Coronavirus: One Blow Molder’s Response

What do you do to protect your customers if your state authorities tell you to shut down and send your workers home until the current health crisis is over? Bob Confer, president of Confer Plastics in North Tonawanda, N.Y., sent out a letter Monday that outlines one energetic response.

Confer Plastics makes a well-known line of blow molded pool and spa accessories and also does custom blow molding, with 18 machines and over 220 employees.

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Editors’ note: The editors of Additive Manufacturing have heard from 3D printing businesses in the United States that have seen both positive and negative effects from the global COVID-19 pandemic. The stories range from increased orders as OEMs look to replace parts previously sourced from Asia, to new questions about social distancing and workplace policies. We are collecting these stories and will update this page with the newest information at the top as responses come in. If you have a story to share, email us

For more information on business conditions, see Gardner Intelligence. To find 3D printing services, see our Supplier Directory. For guidance on approaching coronavirus as an employer, we recommend the CDC website

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After record years, the automotive industry is facing difficult times with multiple market uncertainties and global production volume declines. Even without the coronavirus, which is rapidly spreading internationally and exerting a tangible effect on both processes and value creation in many companies in the supply chain, the German Association of the Automotive Industry (VDA) was expecting the Chinese market to contract by 2 percent in 2020, and is now expecting a decline of 7 percent. 

Mix that in with declining new car sales across the board globally, the ongoing transition to electric vehicles and the recent supply chain disruption from the coronavirus outbreak and you have a recipe for a long-term decline in orders and employment.

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