5/1/2017

Deep-Hole Drilling, Milling Machines Streamline Mold Production

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Unisig USC and USC-M deep-hole drilling and milling machines are designed to allow moldmakers to combine operations, reduce setup time, increase accuracy and eliminate mold design restrictions associated with traditional machining centers.

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Unisig USC and USC-M deep-hole drilling and milling machines are designed to allow moldmakers to combine operations, reduce setup time, increase accuracy and eliminate mold design restrictions associated with traditional machining centers.

The reliable and compact column-type USC machines perform BTA and gundrilling operations and can generate highly accurate holes ranging to 1.5" in diameter in large workpieces on available table weight capacities ranging to 50 tons. For increased part processing capability, optional milling spindles and rotary tables are also available.

USC-M series machining centers use two independent spindles along with rotary workpiece tables and programmable headstock inclinations to perform high-accuracy, seven-axis deep-hole drilling of hole diameters ranging to 2". Advanced CNCs provide five-axis positioning, while automatic tool changing and laser presetting contribute to the machines’ abilities to perform all required machining in one operation.

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