Building an Industry Reputation

Inspiring our next generation of mold builders and manufacturers is a passion for the AMBA Chicago Chapter.

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The AMBA Chicago Chapter is always on the move doing something to promote careers in mold manufacturing. Most recently, the Chapter hooked up with Triton College and its GADgET Girl Program to present to a room full of young girls about fun, fulfilling careers in moldmaking. 

A passionate Chuck Klingler, vice president of Janler Corp., took the lead on the presentation. “I feel very lucky to have had the opportunity to speak to young people and students on their search for a career. This is something everyone needed when they were growing up, but not everyone got it,” Klingler says.

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Chuck’s passion for manufacturing comes easily to him. He was blessed with a wonderful family, guidance and mentorship early in his life from his father, uncles and countless engineers with whom he’s had the opportunity to work throughout his career. So, he has always felt obligated to pass that passion on to the next generation. He wants others to be aware of an industry that has given him a good living and a rewarding career to help support his family.

 

“The concept that manufacturing something from a raw material into a product of higher value that can be sold and converted to cash money is new for most students. Even more so is how a mold is made and what it can produce. Seeing the kids’ eyes open wide, searching for more information, is exhilarating for me! It fuels my speech,” Klingler says.

He notes that our educational system has a huge gap of industrial experience, making these in-person meetings vital to conveying a message from the manufacturing industry about the opportunities and positions that are now available and what the future workplace and employment opportunities will look like. “We need to deliver this information to the schools, students and parents who help make the early decisions on career choices,” Klingler says.

He notes that our educational system has a huge gap of industrial experience, making these in-person meetings vital to conveying a message from the manufacturing industry about the opportunities and positions that are now available and what the future workplace and employment opportunities will look like.

 

Let’s face it, students are looking for something. They don’t exactly know what, but as we explain the many processes involved with moldmaking and plastics and display the many job functions, they become interested.

“The questions start, and the interaction ignites. If you can plant an idea that helps them find a career path to investigate, you have done a great service. Grab your “Atta-Boy,” take a deep breath, and get onto another! There is a huge need for this service,” Klingler says. He vows to continue contributing in any way he can because not only is it rewarding, it confirms how much he’s been blessed.

If you need some help, check out moldyourcareer.org. This site, established by the Chicago Chapter’s Education Committee, provides moldmaking career awareness tools via local industry news, events, resources and links, including a great presentation that Chicago Mold's Bill Kloskowski gave a few years ago to his daughter's class.

All of us working in mold manufacturing—no matter our role—have an obligation to promote our industry to help build the reputation of what mold builders do for the world. Chances are, what we say will inspire a young boy or girl who already likes to work with his or her hands and understands how things work. Those are the kids we want as future mold builders.

All of us working in mold manufacturing—no matter our role—have an obligation to promote our industry to help build the reputation of what mold builders do for the world.

 

 

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