4/24/2007 | 1 MINUTE READ

Managing Up and Down During a Crisis

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During any crisis, your plan needs to be communicated to senior managers and employees. But does your plan translate well up and down your organization? Organizations have begun to pay close attention to crisis management over the past five years. But it’s not enough to be have a plan, you need to have a plan that is communicated appropriately. The way BCP teams communicate their message to senior executives, middle managers, staff, and clients is essential to the organization’s business resiliency and recovery. The primary goal during a crisis is to clearly communicate your organization's objectives, the protection of life and property and the continuance or business after the crisis. Organizations need to form working committees and strategies for the process to become effective and accepted. Policies and procedures need to be communicated among senior management, security, business continuity/disaster management representatives, and internal communications representatives. Many organizations that are not prepared hire consultants at top dollar as a quick fix solution. This is the wrong approach. Interfacing a crisis management team with external consultants might be your initial approach. But first, you will need to consider how much the program will cost your organization and how to develop a budget for an effective crisis management program.

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Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

During any crisis, your plan needs to be communicated to senior managers and employees. But does your plan translate well up and down your organization? Organizations have begun to pay close attention to crisis management over the past five years. But it’s not enough to be have a plan, you need to have a plan that is communicated appropriately. The way BCP teams communicate their message to senior executives, middle managers, staff, and clients is essential to the organization’s business resiliency and recovery. The primary goal during a crisis is to clearly communicate your organization's objectives, the protection of life and property and the continuance or business after the crisis.
      
Organizations need to form working committees and strategies for the process to become effective and accepted. Policies and procedures need to be communicated among senior management, security, business continuity/disaster management representatives, and internal communications representatives. Many organizations that are not prepared hire consultants at top dollar as a quick fix solution. This is the wrong approach. Interfacing a crisis management team with external consultants might be your initial approach. But first, you will need to consider how much the program will cost your organization and how to develop a budget for an effective crisis management program.

 

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