Product Defect Analysis

Product Defect Analysis

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NVision, Inc.'s (Coppell, TX) Engineering Service Division is now offering product defect analysis, which can potentially be introduced in product liability litigation to prove a manufacturer innocent of producing a defective or harmful product. The company has partnered with Materials Analysis, a Dallas-based engineering firm specializing in litigation support, to provide this service.

To produce a product's geometry, which will later be analyzed by Materials Analysis for possible defects, NVision uses its non-contact MAXOS measurement system and HandHeld Scanner. The HandHeld scanner is a portable device that is capable of capturing 3D geometry from components of virtually any size. It is attached to a mechanical arm that moves about the object, freeing the user to capture data rapidly and with a high degree of resolution. The MAXOS uses a proprietary non-contact probe consisting of a concentrated light that collects individual points at a rate of 100 per second, many times faster than a CMM. The MAXOS provides accuracy of +/- 0.0002" and a resolution between measured points down to 0.00001".

NVision's non-contact measurement and scanning technologies have already provided critical assistance in several product liability cases. In one case, it was necessary to inspect a product defect that had caused a critical component to break and cause an airplane to lose altitude and crash. If the defect was an inclusion in a casting it would indicate a manufacturing defect and would likely be shaped like a stringer or half-ellipse. However, if the defect was a corrosion pit that had occurred long after manufacturing, and had not been properly addressed when the aircraft was last serviced, it would likely be hemispherical in shape.

NVision's Engineering Service Division examined the defect with the MAXOS and HandHeld Scanner and captured the defect's complete geometry, then generated a point cloud consisting of the coordinates of individual points. The technicians used software that comes with the scanner to convert the point cloud to a polygon mesh. They then used reverse engineering software to convert the polygon data to a surface model. They exported the surface model in the STEP format and imported it into computer aided design (CAD) software where they converted it to a solid model.

www.nvision3d.com

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