Automated Die/Mold Machining Cell Can Boost Quality, Utilization

Makino offers machine technologies and engineering services that can help manufacturers implement machine automation for die/mold applications, including hard milling, graphite milling, five-axis machining, and sinker and wire EDM.

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Makino offers machine technologies and engineering services that can help manufacturers implement machine automation for die/mold applications, including hard milling, graphite milling, five-axis machining, and sinker and wire EDM. This automation is said to result in improved quality, increased utilization and reduced labor.

Complex material-handling cells can eliminate setups and prevent stack-up error, providing high efficiency and precision. For example, an Erowa ERC can be set up to shuttle both workpieces and electrodes between a Makino EDNC6 sinker EDM and a v33i five-axis graphite VMC. This equipment is well-suited for the low-volume, high-mix nature of die/mold applications, the company says.

The VMC is said to provide extreme accuracy, especially in contoured shapes, for applications requiring long hours of continuous hard milling with reduced part setups. It features a specially designed tilt-trunnion table delivering full five-axis simultaneous milling for intricate 3D shapes. The added five-axis features offer increased accessibility to undercut areas, oddly positioned features and complex geometries, with shorter tool lengths and higher spindle speeds. The EDNC6 sinker offers the speed and precision typically associated with smaller machine platforms, but in a larger stroke machine. Its high-speed, core-cooled Z-axis and HyperCut technologies guarantee the fastest possible cycle time with low electrode wear while achieving high accuracy and excellent surface quality, the company says.

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Three Takeaways from Die/Mold Expo

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