MMT Blog

Throwback Thursday: Codes of Conduct

Steve Johnson, who works with me on his Maintenance Matters series, shares his thoughts on how old habits die hard when it comes to maintenance cultures. Back in 2006 he was hearing from toolmakers, repair technicians and the management personnel who really wanted to improve operations that a communication/teamwork chasm still exists, so he decided to provide a little insight on a few unwritten codes of conduct. In Steve's words below:

For Salary Folks Don’t:

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It’s time for another foray into past case study features that have been published in MMT. I’m taking a slightly deeper dive and highlighting those from the first six issues of 2015. Stay with me, though, because while I know products evolve and needs change, not every shop is on the same level with another, and you may just find some important and helpful tip or product feature that you didn’t know you needed until you read about it.

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Everyone in this industry agrees that the sooner you expose kids to the idea of manufacturing as a career, the better. We all know that part of that process has to be getting kids excited about mathematics and other STEM-related curriculum while they're in middle school. Well, Mary and Marty Key are doing it by establishing a new program called Key Up Education.

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Cavity Pressure Selection Options and Solutions

"When I worked in our customer support department, we started with a simple question: What problem are you trying to solve? Is it short shots? Flash? Dimensions? You want to put a transducer where the problem is, plain and simple. For most of you that is going to be the last place to fill or what we commonly refer to as the end of cavity. The majority of quality defects can be correlated to the pressure at this location. Too much pressure and the parts get bigger, not enough pressure and the parts get smaller. All in all, a pretty straight forward correlation.

When determining the end of cavity, we typically just ask customers to produce a short shot and place a sensor closest to that location. If the tool hasn’t been built yet, a flow simulation study can help determine that last place to fill. Short of that, experience and gate location is also an option for determining the end of cavity location.

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