The Mold Shop Puzzle: Creating Constructive Change: Sales

When a highly effective, natural salesperson’s habits and instincts are closely observed, common characteristics and actions can be readily tracked. So to help you get started in sales, here are two important first steps.

Nothing strikes fear into the heart of a moldmaker faster than telling him he has to be a salesperson. Even with the reality that nothing happens until a sale is made, this job function is still one that they want to avoid.  

Although some people are natural born salesmen, this single fact has created the myth that selling is a feat only a few can master, which is mostly talent as opposed to a learned process. Nothing is farther from the truth.  

When a highly effective, natural salesperson’s habits and instincts are closely observed, common characteristics and actions can be readily tracked. So to help you get started in sales, here are two important first steps.

1. Use passion to overcome buyers’ fear.  
For every company that is looking to invest in a new machine or to kick off a large mold build project, there is always one thing that each sales team must address, and that is to overcome buyers’ fear.  The simple art of selling is to remove fear from the selling process, and those who can remove that fear are usually the ones who end up getting the sale. There is one key characteristic that helps to eliminate this fear: a passion for what you are selling.

When it comes to a mold shop, usually the salesperson is the owner, and if the owner cannot portray a passion for what they do and how they do it, no one can.  The goal of removing fear is achieved when two people share the passion and excitement for a similar subject, and you both are looking at things not as a salesperson versus a customer but as one singular team to solve a problem.

Your passion will drive the sale and give credibility to claims and promises you make. With passion for doing what is right, you can then call prospects with the feeling that you are really calling them not to get business, but to help. One constant is that you have to make the dreaded cold call and/or visit new customers, so create a list of customers you would like to have, then call or visit, using your passion to create a bond to helping them with their problems.

2. Understand your customers and their problems.
Understanding your customers and what their problems are is crucial to having empathy and removing fear from the sales process.  Many salespeople are very fluent in explaining the wonderful things about their product or service, but if your customer doesn’t need any of these great features, you just wasted time.  It is not what is important to you, but what is important to your customer that needs to be discussed.  

Do research before you meet with your customers. The single best tool is to ask your customers what is important to them. Prior to calling or visiting, write your questions down. Allow your customers to do most of the talking, while you prompt them with questions. This way you get a better idea about what they really fear.  Once they have told you their fears, then you match their fears with your solutions. At this point most of the selling is done; the rest is negotiation.

Selling is not a great mystery, just a series of planned steps that if taken will be the beginning of creating sales.  Remember too that although mold manufacturers need new customers—especially when current ones do not pay their bills or respect your value add—it is less expensive to keep the customers you already have. So give as much effort to keeping them happy as your competitors are willing to give to take them away from you.


Contributor:
Bob Byers is the founder and Managing Director for Byers & Associates LLC. He has served the mold and die industry in several different capacities. He has been a chosen speaker at several national conferences of the AMBA, NTMA, Powder Metal and Aerospace Groups, along with special speaking engagements at the many local chapters of these groups. Bob has vast experience in all aspects of moldmaking and manufacturing.

For More Information:
Byers & Associates LLC
(574) 286-5162
bob.byers@byersandassociates.net
http://byersandassociates.net/


 

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